Small RhombusA proven nonsurgical procedure that stimulates the body's natural healing processes to strengthen joints weakened by trauma or arthritis.

Prolotherapy Studies

Prolotherapy for Thumb and Finger

J Altern Complement Med. 2000 Aug;6(4):311-20.Randomized, prospective, placebo-controlled double-blind study of dextrose prolotherapy for osteoarthritic thumb and finger (DIP, PIP, and trapeziometacarpal) joints: evidence of clinical efficacy. Reeves KD, Hassanein K., Meadowbrook Rehabilitation Hospital, Gardner, Kansas, USA.

OBJECTIVES: To determine the clinical benefit of dextrose prolotherapy (injection of growth factors or growth factor stimulators) in osteoarthritic finger joints.
DESIGN: Prospective randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial.
SETTINGS/LOCATION: Outpatient physical medicine clinic.
SUBJECTS: Six months of pain history was required in each joint studied as well as one of the following: grade 2 or 3 osteophyte, grade 2 or 3 joint narrowing, or grade 1 osteophyte plus grade 1 joint narrowing. Distal interphalangeal (DIP), proximal interphalangeal (PIP), and trapeziometacarpal (thumb CMC) joints were eligible. Thirteen patients (with seventy-four symptomatic osteoarthitic joints) received active treatment, and fourteen patients (with seventy-six symptomatic osteoarthritic joints) served as controls.
INTERVENTION: One half milliliter (0.5 mL) of either 10% dextrose and 0.075% xylocaine in bacteriostatic water (active solution) or 0.075% xylocaine in bacteriostatic water (control solution) was injected on medial and lateral aspects of each affected joint. This was done at 0, 2, and 4 months with assessment at 6 months after first injection.
OUTCOME MEASURES: One-hundred millimeter (100 mm) Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) for pain at rest, pain with joint movement and pain with grip, and goniometrically-measured joint flexion.
RESULTS: Pain at rest and with grip improved more in the dextrose group but not significantly. Improvement in pain with movement of fingers improved significantly more in the dextrose group (42% versus 15% with a p value of .027). Flexion range of motion improved more in the dextrose group (p = .003). Side effects were minimal.
CONCLUSION: Dextrose prolotherapy was clinically effective and safe in the treatment of pain with joint movement and range limitation in osteoarthritic finger joints.


Click on a joint below to learn more...
Prolotherapy for TMJ PainProlotherapy for Head and Neck PainProlotherapy for Shoulder PainProlotherapy for Elbow PainProlotherapy for Back PainProlotherapy for Sacro-Illiac JointProlotherapy for Hip and Groin PainProlotherapy for Coccyx PainProlotherapy for Knee PainProlotherapy for Ankle Pain (Achilles Tendon)Prolotherapy for Foot Pain (Plantar Fasciitis)Prolotherapy for Hand and Finger Pain